Critical Success Factors for Using Typology in Organizations

Start with the right model or lens for the need and the organization. A good framework will provide . . .

  • Easy-to-understand and remember names of the types that people of varying levels of education can remember and use
  • Practices for individual, leader, and team development
  • Easy-to-observe differences so members can identify the patterns in others
  • Actionable behaviors to increase interpersonal agility

Gain top leadership buy-in, support, and promotion. Ensure emotional safety to allay fears of getting fired etc. Control for bias, stereotyping, and privileging certain types. Present information so there is grass roots acceptance and excitement. Meet the needs of varied learning styles and mixed educational levels. Create sustainability measures such as

  • New-employee sessions
  • Tangible reminders such as job aids and posters
  • Inclusion in performance standards
  • Inclusion in newsletters and regular meetings

Integrate into applications such as

  • Leadership and management development
  • Team development
  • Employee engagement
  • Strategic planning
  • Customer service
  • Marketing and sales
  • Quality
  • Rewards systems
  • Performance improvement

Measure for bottom line results. Consider external constraining forces such as the current economic climate. Establish the five levels of expertise to keep the information alive.

  1. Individual self-awareness
  2. Champions who want to explore more and bring the information up in meetings and conversations
  3. Facilitators who can facilitate self-discovery and difficult conversations
  4. Change agents who can use for coaching, serious conflict resolution, and even organizational change
  5. Content experts whose primary work is with the models. These are usually external to the organizations and these experts provide training and guidance to the other levels.