Linda Berens “I started this blog to give voice to what is in my head and share important issues in the fields of personality type, organizational change, coaching, and development.”
 – Linda Berens

  1. Identifying Interaction Styles and Relating To Others

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    By Linda Ernst Are you getting the most out of the “red book”, Understanding Yourself and Others, an Introduction to Interaction Styles 2.0, when you use it to help clients clarify their best-fit Interaction Style? Are you using the material in the book to the best advantage? Here are some suggestions for using the book to help clients identify Interaction Styles and relate to others… Identifying Others Activity – What to Look For This is a great activity in a workshop and can be a good discussion with an individual client. Have participants start by reading the “What to Look...
  2. Clarifying Interaction Styles Self-Discovery

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    by Linda Ernst Are you getting the most out of the “red book”, Understanding Yourself and Others, an Introduction to Interaction Styles 2.0, when you use it to help clients clarify their best-fit Interaction Style? Are you using the material in the book to the best advantage? Here are some suggestions for using the book to help clients clarify their Interaction Style: Clarifying Your Interaction Style – Things-In-Common We’ve found that this information often provides the “aha” moments for participants sorting between 2 styles. For many clients, it’s the discussion that accompanies these pages (18-22) that is the most helpful...
  3. Agendas for Change

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    Connections have been made to temperament and change in Donna Dunning’s book, Quick Guide to the Four Temperaments and Change 3.0 and these really make sense to me. I’ve been puzzling over what the Interaction Styles model would predict about change. Then it hit me…the movement tendency that is favored by each Interaction Style would give us some insight. In my last blog, Change: Lessons from the Body, I talked about how if you push the change too fast and too hard, you will get resistance that may result in only a temporary change. My consulting bias is always to...
  4. Change: Lessons from the Body

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    You can’t force a change without a lot of pain. The system will work very hard to maintain itself I came back from training in New Zealand and Australia with a pain in the ball of my foot. Given that this is a major problem for a trainer, I’ve been seeking all kinds of help. A massage therapist said the pain may be a result of tight muscles in the legs. So he did some work on key pressure points that brought some relief for a while. I was a bit sore, but nothing compared to when I decided I’d...

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